Ornithologi

A studio for bird study

Category: shorebirds

American Ornithological Society Conference 2019 Logo

by Bryce W. Robinson

AOS2019-Logo-draft I-01

I am privileged to share the logo that I created for the American Ornithological Society’s 2019 conference. The logo features three Bar-tailed Godwit (Limosa lapponica baueri), a flagship bird for Alaska and a focal species for some of Alaska’s most influential ornithologists.

I worked closely with the conference planning chair, Colleen Handel of the USGS Alaska Science Center. We created a logo that ties in closely with the theme of the meeting – Birds on the Edge: Dynamic Boundaries. Colleen is part of a team of researchers headed by her husband, Robert E. Gill (also of USGS), that are responsible for discovering the incredible, sometimes 9 day non-stop flight of Alaska’s Bar-tailed Godwits as they return to Alaska from their wintering grounds in southeast Australia and New Zealand (see Gill et al. 2008). As such, one can see why the species is a great choice to celebrate the AOS meeting being held in Anchorage.

To register for the meeting or learn more, visit the AOS 2019 Conference website. Also, be sure to check out the merchandise that features this logo.

Advertisements

Charadrius Plate

by Bryce W. Robinson

2L3A7578-2-01

My friend Dan asked me to paint a shorebird plate for an auction at a conference that he will be attending in Peru in November. I chose to highlight the genus Charadrius for the plate, choosing five species from the new world. From the top, I’ve illustrated the Collared Plover (Charadrius collaris), Puna Plover (C. alticola), Snowy Plover (C. nivosus), Semipalmated Plover (C. semipalmatus), and Wilson’s Plover (C. wilsonia).

I learned a great deal from this painting. I am seeing a bit of growth in my painting over the past year, and this piece in particular represents a move forward. I’ll be painting many more plates that highlight species or subspecies groups.

Sharp-tailed Sandpiper (Calidris acuminata) on the Alaska Peninsula

by Bryce W. Robinson

2l3a0673

The Sharp-tailed Sandpiper (Calidris acuminata) breeds in eastern Siberia and winters in the south Pacific, but a large portion of the juvenile cohort pass through western Alaska on their first fall migration. While I was on the Alaska Peninsula waiting for Bar-tailed Godwits (Limosa lapponica) in September, I got to see a few late moving juvenile Sharp-tailed Sandpipers mixed in with massive Dunlin (Calidris alpina) flocks.

2l3a0629

At high tide each day our group would hide in the elymus grass and watch shorebirds come into the high rack line to roost. On one occasion, I noticed the opportunity to photograph a juvenile sharpie, so crept on my belly towards the roosted flock. Once I was close enough to take quality photos, I raised my camera. At the same time the flock took to the air and my chance seemed ruined. I thought it odd though, because the roosting Dunlin are usually tolerant if you are careful and move slowly. I looked around and saw a Bald Eagle passing overhead, which was certainly the reason for the panic. I cursed a bit and looked around to see when the flock might return to roost. As I scanned around, I noticed a lone bird still roosted in the rack line. It was the sharpie, which hadn’t pushed to the air with the Dunlin flock. It’s an interesting note, and something I’ve observed with the few Rock Sandpipers that were associating with the Dunlin flocks as well. On few occasions, the other species opted to stay put despite the flock erupting into flight.

2l3a0611

I’d love the opportunity to get to know Sharp-tailed Sandpipers better. Like other birds of the region, the juveniles represent one of the excellent species along the migratory route of the west coast of Alaska that make the place so unique and alluring.

Rock Sandpiper (Calidris ptilocnemis) – A GIF to illustrate the power of feathers for rendering shape

by Bryce W. Robinson

ROSA.gif

I finally had the pleasure of seeing a “nominate” Rock Sandpiper (Calidris ptilocnemis ptilocnemis) during my time on the Bristol Bay coast of the Alaska Peninsula. This bird was hanging out with darker Rock Sandpipers (likely tschuktschorum) and Dunlin. These birds breed on Bering Sea Islands and mostly winter in Alaska’s Cook Inlet, farther north than any other shorebird (Gill et al. 2002).

While sifting through the many photos I took of this bird I found three taken almost simultaneously that illustrate the power of feathers for rendering a birds shape, and how much and quickly that can change for an individual bird.

After seeing the potential of putting the three photos together, I taught myself how to create a GIF (Graphic Interchangeable Format). I feel a GIF is an excellent way to show how only a few seconds and a relaxed posture can change the shape of a bird.

Referenced literature:

Gill, Robert E., Pavel S. Tomkovich and Brian J. McCaffery. (2002). Rock Sandpiper (Calidris ptilocnemis), The Birds of North America (P. G. Rodewald, Ed.). Ithaca: Cornell Lab of Ornithology; Retrieved from the Birds of North America: https://birdsna.org/Species-Account/bna/species/rocsan

DOI: 10.2173/bna.686