Ornithologi

A studio for bird study

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Plectrophenax Illustration Featured in the Cornell Lab of Ornithology’s Living Bird Magazine: Complementary to an Article on the Birds of St. Matthew Island by Irby Lovette

by Bryce W. Robinson

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Plectrophenax spp., an illustration to complement the article detailing the 2018 Expedition to St. Matthew Island in Living Bird by Irby Lovette. Mckay’s Bunting (Plectrophenax hyperboreus; left), and Snow Bunting (Plectrophenax nivalis; right).

My involvement in the 2018 USFWS and USGS expedition to St. Matthew Island in the Bering Sea was as a field ornithologist, tasked with conducting surveys and collecting data on the abundance and nesting ecology of Mckay’s Bunting (Plectrophenax hyperboreus) and  the Pribilof Rock Sandpiper (Calidris ptilocnemis ptilocnemis). Of my four companions during my time on the island, two were from the Cornell Lab of Ornithology; Irby Lovette and Andy Johnson. Irby came along to assist Andy in filming and recording the birdlife on the island. He was also focused on experiencing the island to eventually write an article in Living Bird magazine. This article is now available online. It is a well written treatment of our experience, and details some of the fascinating history of the island as well. Also newly released to complement the article is a video, produced by Andy Johnson, that details some of the birdlife that we encountered on the island. It also highlights the purpose of our visit, and describes very well the feeling of being on this remote Bering Sea island.

I show up a few times in this video, in two occasions of which I am field sketching and painting. When in the field, I generally spend weather days or down-time sketching. I took the opportunity on a number of occasions and greatly enjoyed painting while in such an inspiring place. Irby took notice of my skills as an illustrator, and asked about my interest to paint an illustration to complement the article for Living Bird.

My drive to integrate illustration into my time on one of the most remote locations in North America enriched my experience. It is my hope that the illustrations I worked out on the island become part of a collection of products that complement the research we conducted. I hope these products provide a point of reference, and serve as a description for our experience. I envision an eager naturalist preparing for a trip to St. Matthew Island, as removed in time as we are to Fuertes and the short visit of the Harriman Expedition, exploring the various productions that have arisen and are yet to arise from our relatively short stay on the island. It is my hope that these products stir excitement and attention for this lonely location, support its preservation, and encourage further research into the life histories of its inhabitants.

Female Mckay's Bunting painting

Female Mckay’s Bunting. This is the painting I am working on in the video. It is now under the care of Andy Johnson in Ithaca, New York.

Mckay's Bunting pair illustration

A male and female Mckay’s Bunting painted on St. Matthew Island in 2018. This painting is now under the care of Irby Lovette at the Cornell Lab of Ornithology in Ithaca, New York.

Our month-long stay on the island was packed with incredible experiences and important discoveries. Such experiences are mentioned in Irby’s article, yet they truly only skim the surface. Over the next year or two, more products will come forward from our short stay on the island, so please stay tuned.

The Living Bird article on the birds of St. Matthew Island written by Irby Lovette can be found at the link below:

Birds of St. Matthew Island, the Most Remote Place in the United States

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The five inhabitants of St. Matthew Island in summer 2018. Left to right: Rachel M. Richardson, Steph Walden, Bryce W. Robinson, Irby J. Lovette, and Andy S. Johnson.

 

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Bearded Vulture Illustration for HawkWatch International Shirt Design – Support Worldwide Vulture Conservation

by Bryce W. Robinson

Bearded Vulture

I was given the opportunity to provide a t-shirt design for HawkWatch International featuring the Bearded Vulture. The design and shirt are meant to both raise awareness and support for the important conservation science work of HWI focused on Old World vultures. Old World vultures are facing a myriad of threats that are impacting populations, to the point that most face extinction. Please, learn more about the work of HawkWatch International and consider helping in any way you can. Visit their website to read about the vulture work, and more.  

Click on the photo below to purchase a shirt, and support vulture conservation.

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Alaska Department of Fish and Game 2019 Conservation Stamp Featuring The Golden Eagle – Aquila chrysaetos

by Bryce W. Robinson

ADFG Conservation Stamp - GOEA 2019-01

Support the conservation of Alaska’s wildlife through the purchase of the 2019 Alaska Department of Fish & Game Conservation Stamp!

I had the pleasure of creating this years conservation stamp, highlighting one of Alaska’s most important avian predators, the Golden Eagle (Aquila chrysaetos). Biologists with ADF&G, such as Travis Booms, are currently working on research that aims to learn more about Alaska’s eagle populations and the threats they face, to ensure that this captivating species remains a fixture of Alaska’s wilderness.

To purchase a stamp, and learn more about the various conservation research conducted by Alaska Department of Fish & Game, visit their website.

Remembering Tom Cade: 1928-2019

by Bryce W. Robinson

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Showing Tom Cade an occupied Gyrfalcon nest with a nest camera, recording images for The Peregrine Fund’s Gyrfalcon Conservation Program.

Today I’m remembering Tom Cade, ornithologist and conservation giant. Tom passed away yesterday at the age of 91. His legacy is widespread, not only across the earth but through time, for generations into the future. Rather than describe this enduring legacy, I want to here describe one of my most cherished memories of spending time in the field with Tom as I showed him my study area during my Gyrfalcon work.

While I was conducting my field study on nesting Gyrfalcons in western Alaska, Tom came to visit for a few weeks. He stayed with me and Ellen Whittle, my field partner, in a small apartment in Nome. It’s hard to describe the conditions in such an apartment, but the few photos I’ve included here should be telling. I was so impressed with Tom, since he seemed entirely content to be in this run down shack of an apartment, cramped with two young ambitious biologists. In fact, I think he enjoyed it!

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Tom Cade and Travis Booms, walking along a tundra road on the Seward Peninsula.

Of course, we only spent time indoors when the rain wouldn’t allow otherwise. We made many trips out into the tundra to show Tom around, and Tom also spent time with Travis Booms and Joe Eisaguirre as they flew around the peninsula in a helicopter, accessing Gyrfalcon nesting sites. As we drove the roads with Tom, looking for wildlife and checking on raptor nests, we listened intently as Tom told stories of his last visit to the region nearly 60 years prior. He told us stories of a mid-tundra train wreck, seeing his first Gyrfalcon, and how the Nome area truly was different from his last visit, with more vegetation than he had previously recalled.

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Tom Cade, a man with an incredible legacy and an excellent sense of humor.

Apart from his unending wisdom and knowledge, I was impressed with Tom’s sense of humor. He was having fun, and wasn’t afraid to let it show. As is appropriate in western Alaska, July is a time for King Crab. With Tom in town, we had a great excuse to occupy our time during bouts of rainy weather with Crab feasts! I’ll never forget having crab with such excellent people, and I could tell from the photo above that Tom was having a great time as well.

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Crab Feast! Tom Cade, Bryce Robinson, Ellen Whittle, and Joe Eisaguirre. I think Joe was hitting his limit at this point. Photo courtesy of Travis Booms.

After Tom departed Nome and returned to his home in Boise, and I came home following the field season, we saw each other only intermittently. The last time I saw Tom Cade was in a meeting, only a few months ago. He listened, and only spoke when he needed to. But, he was participating. His passion was enduring, so much so that even until the last parts of his extraordinary life, he participated in the work he had set forth.

It is sad to see people go, but it provides us all a perspective on our lives, how we choose to live them, and who we are and want to be. Reflecting on Tom’s life has caused me to reflect on myself, and how I might honor and continue what the man did for multiple species facing extinction, and for the people he inspired, inspires and will inspire. I’ll take that spirit into the future, and do with it what I can.

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Generations of Gyrfalcon researchers: Bryce Robinson, David L. Anderson, Tom Cade, Travis Booms, and Mike Henderson.

If you’re unfamiliar with the legacy of Tom Cade, visit The Peregrine Fund’s website. Everything you see there is a testament to Tom’s legacy, and what he created. Also visit the following link for a great video highlighting Tom’s life: https://www.peregrinefund.org/people/cade-tom