A studio for bird study

Tag: conservation

Original gouache paintings for sale – Peregrine Falcon profile artwork for The Peregrine Fund’s Global Raptor Impact Network (GRIN)

by Bryce W. Robinson

I’ve been collaborating for some time now with The Peregrine Fund on a big data project they are launching – the Global Raptor Impact Network (GRIN). My role has been to illustrate species profile images for each of the world’s raptor species (raptors as defined in McClure et al. 2019, which comprises around 560-580 species, depending on the taxonomic list applied [see McClure et al. 2020] .

Now available are two original, 9×12″ gouache paintings on hardboard, or a limited edition (1 of 20) 11×14″ high quality, archival and signed giclee print of our very first design for this project, the iconic Peregrine Falcon (Falco peregrinus).

This is an amazing way to help celebrate The Peregrine Fund’s 50th Anniversary as well as to help support the GRIN project.

Learn more about GRIN: https://globalraptors.org/grin/indexAlt.asp

Alaska Department of Fish and Game 2019 Conservation Stamp Featuring The Golden Eagle – Aquila chrysaetos

by Bryce W. Robinson

ADFG Conservation Stamp - GOEA 2019-01

Support the conservation of Alaska’s wildlife through the purchase of the 2019 Alaska Department of Fish & Game Conservation Stamp!

I had the pleasure of creating this years conservation stamp, highlighting one of Alaska’s most important avian predators, the Golden Eagle (Aquila chrysaetos). Biologists with ADF&G, such as Travis Booms, are currently working on research that aims to learn more about Alaska’s eagle populations and the threats they face, to ensure that this captivating species remains a fixture of Alaska’s wilderness.

To purchase a stamp, and learn more about the various conservation research conducted by Alaska Department of Fish & Game, visit their website.

Orange-breasted Falcon Painting

by Bryce W. Robinson

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Orange-breasted Falcon (Falco deiroleucus). Gouache on watercolor paper. ©Bryce W. Robinson.

In a short time I’ll be heading south to northern Central America (primarily Belize and Guatemala) to research Orange-breasted Falcons (Falco deiroleucus). I’ll be working with The Peregrine Fund on their Orange-breasted Falcon project. My main focus will be assessing occupancy at historical territories, investigating potential territories, nest monitoring, banding nestlings, and assessing nest success. All work that I’m familiar with, but in a completely different system.

With the new system comes new opportunities to start fresh and learn. As a birder, my mouth is watering from the anticipation of learning new birdlife to a degree I have yet to experience. Field work with the falcon will be a great vehicle for learning this new bird life, as I’ll be immersed in the system daily, always paying attention to what is around me.

Alaska is an exciting place for an ornithologist, because it is still somewhat a frontier in our basic understanding of some of its birdlife. The Neotropics are similar, but to a greater degree. Due to the nature of the system, and the magnitude of its biodiversity, there is much work still to be done to fill in gaps in our basic understanding of the natural history of some species. This frontier is where I want to be, so I consider myself quite fortunate to begin a potentially five month stint in a place where so many opportunities lay.

I’ll be blogging birdlife along the way, including videos, photos, field sketches and stories. It’ll be a content heavy time, and I’m looking forward to it.