Ornithologi

A studio for bird study

Tag: gouache

Singing Coastal Cactus Wren Perched on Coastal Cholla

by Bryce W. Robinson

 

 

The Cactus Wren (Campylorhynchus brunneicapillus) is a polytypic wren (Family: Troglodytidae) that occurs in the arid southwest of North America. The species comprises five subspecies (Following Rea and Weaver 1990). Birds on the coast of southern California differ in appearance slightly from interior groups, primarily in being paler on the flanks where they have less rich and warm tones. The taxonomy of this coastal group has been in flux, but it is currently recognized by Clements, Howard & Moore, and others as C. b. sandiegensis.

A few years ago, I had the pleasure of getting to know this species well while working with nesting birds along the I-10 corridor in California. I can still hear their iconic rattle song as they sing atop cholla in the intense heat of the Sonoran desert. Their nests also stick in my memory. Often in dense and formidable cholla, the species construct a tunnel nest out of grass. These are some of my favorite nests I’ve encountered in all of my time in the field.

I had the pleasure of illustrating this bird for silent auction at the Sea and Sage Audubon Society’s annual benefit dinner. Hopefully it generates some funds for them and finds a good home.

If you like this image and want a print, you can get one HERE.

Referenced Literature:

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Melospiza Plate

by Bryce W. Robinson

If you like this painting, prints are available in the online shop.

Orange-breasted Falcon (Falco deiroleucus) Painting: A Mile Marker

by Bryce W. Robinson

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I feel really fortunate for the opportunity to illustrate and paint during the six months I’ve spent in Central America. My time here has really expanded my understanding of birdlife, and strengthened all of my skills with which I employ to communicate this understanding to others. I’ve been a bit more familiar with the Orange-breasted Falcon each time I’ve painted it, and on reflection I think it shows in each painting. This has taught me the value of studying structure, plumage, posture, effects of light, and personality in each species I illustrate. Being familiar with your subject (from field study) is integral to rendering it correctly, which means I’ll need to spend more time in the field looking at birds.

Singing Brewer’s Sparrow (Spizella breweri) on Sagebrush

by Bryce W. Robinson

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Singing Brewer’s Sparrow (Spizella brewer) on sagebrush. Gouache on watercolor paper.

One of the best parts of spring in the Sagebrush landscape of western North America are it’s singing inhabitants. The Brewer’s Sparrow may be my favorite, because of its subdued but beautiful plumage and distinct trill song. On a spring morning at sunrise, one can walk through a healthy stand of sagebrush, songs erupting all around, as multiple males sing atop their sagebrush posts.

Brewer’s Sparrows have a distinct buzzing song, that sounds superficially simple and distinct. But, their songs can be variable and have multiple types as described in Rich (2002). See the figure below to gain a familiarity with the variability.

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Song types of the Brewer’s Sparrow, long (A) and short (B). Figure taken from Birds of North America Online, adapted from Rich (2002). 

Rich (2002) found that the variability seen above seems to follow no geographic trend or isolation, nor does there seem to be any song sharing among neighbors. High turnover among territories and potential for natal dispersal could limit the development of local dialects, etc. Interesting stuff…

If you’re unfamiliar with the sound of a singing Brewer’s Sparrow, be sure to visit Xeno-Canto and explore.

My friend Eli is wrapping up some research investigating the impacts of anthropogenic noise on sagebrush inhabitants in southwest Idaho. Breeding Brewer’s Sparrows were among a few focal species of her study. She’s currently working through the publication process, and when her work comes to surface in print, I’ll be sure to share. I expect that anthropogenic noise has some masking impacts on a Brewer’s Sparrow song, and in turn could potentially change the dynamics of song structure under anthropogenic noise blankets, etc. More research and time will tell.

Here is a short clip of a singing Brewer’s Sparrow in Idaho that I took through my Zeiss scope. The song is barely audible because of how distant I was from the singing bird:

Referenced Literature:

Rich, T. D. 2002. The short song of Brewer’s Sparrow: individual and geographic variation in southern Idaho. Western North American Naturalist 62(3): 288-299.