A studio for bird study

Tag: wren

Singing Coastal Cactus Wren Perched on Coastal Cholla

by Bryce W. Robinson

 

 

The Cactus Wren (Campylorhynchus brunneicapillus) is a polytypic wren (Family: Troglodytidae) that occurs in the arid southwest of North America. The species comprises five subspecies (Following Rea and Weaver 1990). Birds on the coast of southern California differ in appearance slightly from interior groups, primarily in being paler on the flanks where they have less rich and warm tones. The taxonomy of this coastal group has been in flux, but it is currently recognized by Clements, Howard & Moore, and others as C. b. sandiegensis.

A few years ago, I had the pleasure of getting to know this species well while working with nesting birds along the I-10 corridor in California. I can still hear their iconic rattle song as they sing atop cholla in the intense heat of the Sonoran desert. Their nests also stick in my memory. Often in dense and formidable cholla, the species construct a tunnel nest out of grass. These are some of my favorite nests I’ve encountered in all of my time in the field.

I had the pleasure of illustrating this bird for silent auction at the Sea and Sage Audubon Society’s annual benefit dinner. Hopefully it generates some funds for them and finds a good home.

If you like this image and want a print, you can get one HERE.

Referenced Literature:

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Singing House Wren on the Boise River

by Bryce W. Robinson

 

I recorded a singing House Wren (Troglodytes aedon) today while banding birds along the Boise River with the Intermountain Bird Observatory (note the bird is banded!).

Although spring migration hasn’t hit in its entirety at this site, the House Wrens seem to have arrived in full. There are at least three different individual males singing in the area, and I’ve noticed an additional four individuals in the area as well. The House Wren population at this site seems to be healthy.

Unfortunately the video I recorded does not capture the song of the House Wren. I wasn’t too far from the wren, but I believe the inability of the phone to capture the song is related to the masking of other noises in the environment (and the iPhone’s lack of a directional mic). First and foremost it was a windy day, which I believe is the main contributor to the masking. On top of the wind was the noise of the busy highway, the noise of the Boise River, and nearby construction (all large bandwidth, but mostly low frequency). With both natural and anthropogenic noise, I wonder how House Wren territory distributions differ between an area like this and a relatively noiseless area such as a remote forest location away from a river.

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House Wren (Troglodytes aedon) banded at the Intermountain Bird Observatory’s Boise River site on the east end of Boise, Idaho.

Despite the heightened noise, the wrens in this area seem to be thick and continuing with life as they would. A study may enlighten us on the human noise impacts coupled with natural noise (rivers, etc.) on bird territory distributions like in this case, but if I were to hedge a bet I’d say the House Wren is one species that seems to weather the added impacts of humanity enough to maintain a regular and healthy population within human disturbance areas.

Canyon Wren- Catherpes mexicanus

by Bryce W. Robinson

I went to a reliable spot for Rosy-Finch today in hopes of getting some footage of the birds returning to roost. I won’t go into great detail, because I still want to get the footage and share the peculiar behavior of the flock. I was unable to get any decent video of the Black Rosy-Finch I saw there, but I was able to get some decent clips of a very interactive Canyon Wren.

This clip is very short, but I had to share it anyway. I’ll be back to visit this critter again soon to film some more, and make another try at the Rosy-Finch. Until then, this will have to do.